MySQL · Apache · Kafka

Apache Kafka – Topic to Database (MySQL – Table replication from Employees to Employees_replica via kafka topic)

https://github.com/chriszones2000/Kafka-Java/blob/master/TopicToDB.java

 

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MySQL · Apache · Kafka

Apache Kafka & MySQL – Database to Topic

https://github.com/chriszones2000/Kafka-Java/blob/master/DBToTopic.java

Redhat / CEntOS / Oracle Linux · Tips and Tricks

How to Delete all files except a Pattern in Unix

Good Morning To All My TECH Ghettos,

Today ima show ya’ll a fuckin command to delete all files except a pattern,

ya’ll can use it in a script or even commandline ……. Life gets easy as Fuck !!!!!!!!

find . -type f ! -name ‘<pattern>’ -delete

A Live Example

Before

Before

After the following Command

find . -type f ! -name ‘*.gz’ -delete

After

Operating System · Redhat / CEntOS / Oracle Linux · Ubuntu

How To Patch and Protect Linux Kernel Stack Clash Vulnerability CVE-2017-1000364 [ 19/June/2017 ]

Avery serious security problem has been found in the Linux kernel called “The Stack Clash.” It can be exploited by attackers to corrupt memory and execute arbitrary code. An attacker could leverage this with another vulnerability to execute arbitrary code and gain administrative/root account privileges. How do I fix this problem on Linux?

the-stack-clash-on-linux-openbsd-netbsd-freebsd-solaris
The Qualys Research Labs discovered various problems in the dynamic linker of the GNU C Library (CVE-2017-1000366) which allow local privilege escalation by clashing the stack including Linux kernel. This bug affects Linux, OpenBSD, NetBSD, FreeBSD and Solaris, on i386 and amd64. It can be exploited by attackers to corrupt memory and execute arbitrary code.

What is CVE-2017-1000364 bug?

From RHN:

A flaw was found in the way memory was being allocated on the stack for user space binaries. If heap (or different memory region) and stack memory regions were adjacent to each other, an attacker could use this flaw to jump over the stack guard gap, cause controlled memory corruption on process stack or the adjacent memory region, and thus increase their privileges on the system. This is a kernel-side mitigation which increases the stack guard gap size from one page to 1 MiB to make successful exploitation of this issue more difficult.

As per the original research post:

Each program running on a computer uses a special memory region called the stack. This memory region is special because it grows automatically when the program needs more stack memory. But if it grows too much and gets too close to another memory region, the program may confuse the stack with the other memory region. An attacker can exploit this confusion to overwrite the stack with the other memory region, or the other way around.

A list of affected Linux distros

  1. Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server 5.x
  2. Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server 6.x
  3. Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server 7.x
  4. CentOS Linux Server 5.x
  5. CentOS Linux Server 6.x
  6. CentOS Linux Server 7.x
  7. Oracle Enterprise Linux Server 5.x
  8. Oracle Enterprise Linux Server 6.x
  9. Oracle Enterprise Linux Server 7.x
  10. Ubuntu 17.10
  11. Ubuntu 17.04
  12. Ubuntu 16.10
  13. Ubuntu 16.04 LTS
  14. Ubuntu 12.04 ESM (Precise Pangolin)
  15. Debian 9 stretch
  16. Debian 8 jessie
  17. Debian 7 wheezy
  18. Debian unstable
  19. SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 12 SP2
  20. SUSE Linux Enterprise High Availability 12 SP2
  21. SUSE Linux Enterprise Live Patching 12
  22. SUSE Linux Enterprise Module for Public Cloud 12
  23. SUSE Linux Enterprise Build System Kit 12 SP2
  24. SUSE Openstack Cloud Magnum Orchestration 7
  25. SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 11 SP3-LTSS
  26. SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 11 SP4
  27. SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 SP1-LTSS
  28. SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 SP2
  29. SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for Raspberry Pi 12 SP2

Do I need to reboot my box?

Yes, as most services depends upon the dynamic linker of the GNU C Library and kernel itself needs to be reloaded in memory.

How do I fix CVE-2017-1000364 on Linux?

Type the commands as per your Linux distro. You need to reboot the box. Before you apply patch, note down your current kernel version:
$ uname -a
$ uname -mrs

Sample outputs:

Linux 4.4.0-78-generic x86_64

Debian or Ubuntu Linux

Type the following apt command/apt-get command to apply updates:
$ sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade && sudo apt-get dist-upgrade
Sample outputs:

Reading package lists... Done
Building dependency tree       
Reading state information... Done
Calculating upgrade... Done
The following packages will be upgraded:
  libc-bin libc-dev-bin libc-l10n libc6 libc6-dev libc6-i386 linux-compiler-gcc-6-x86 linux-headers-4.9.0-3-amd64 linux-headers-4.9.0-3-common linux-image-4.9.0-3-amd64
  linux-kbuild-4.9 linux-libc-dev locales multiarch-support
14 upgraded, 0 newly installed, 0 to remove and 0 not upgraded.
Need to get 0 B/62.0 MB of archives.
After this operation, 4,096 B of additional disk space will be used.
Do you want to continue? [Y/n] y
Reading changelogs... Done
Preconfiguring packages ...
(Reading database ... 115123 files and directories currently installed.)
Preparing to unpack .../libc6-i386_2.24-11+deb9u1_amd64.deb ...
Unpacking libc6-i386 (2.24-11+deb9u1) over (2.24-11) ...
Preparing to unpack .../libc6-dev_2.24-11+deb9u1_amd64.deb ...
Unpacking libc6-dev:amd64 (2.24-11+deb9u1) over (2.24-11) ...
Preparing to unpack .../libc-dev-bin_2.24-11+deb9u1_amd64.deb ...
Unpacking libc-dev-bin (2.24-11+deb9u1) over (2.24-11) ...
Preparing to unpack .../linux-libc-dev_4.9.30-2+deb9u1_amd64.deb ...
Unpacking linux-libc-dev:amd64 (4.9.30-2+deb9u1) over (4.9.30-2) ...
Preparing to unpack .../libc6_2.24-11+deb9u1_amd64.deb ...
Unpacking libc6:amd64 (2.24-11+deb9u1) over (2.24-11) ...
Setting up libc6:amd64 (2.24-11+deb9u1) ...
(Reading database ... 115123 files and directories currently installed.)
Preparing to unpack .../libc-bin_2.24-11+deb9u1_amd64.deb ...
Unpacking libc-bin (2.24-11+deb9u1) over (2.24-11) ...
Setting up libc-bin (2.24-11+deb9u1) ...
(Reading database ... 115123 files and directories currently installed.)
Preparing to unpack .../multiarch-support_2.24-11+deb9u1_amd64.deb ...
Unpacking multiarch-support (2.24-11+deb9u1) over (2.24-11) ...
Setting up multiarch-support (2.24-11+deb9u1) ...
(Reading database ... 115123 files and directories currently installed.)
Preparing to unpack .../0-libc-l10n_2.24-11+deb9u1_all.deb ...
Unpacking libc-l10n (2.24-11+deb9u1) over (2.24-11) ...
Preparing to unpack .../1-locales_2.24-11+deb9u1_all.deb ...
Unpacking locales (2.24-11+deb9u1) over (2.24-11) ...
Preparing to unpack .../2-linux-compiler-gcc-6-x86_4.9.30-2+deb9u1_amd64.deb ...
Unpacking linux-compiler-gcc-6-x86 (4.9.30-2+deb9u1) over (4.9.30-2) ...
Preparing to unpack .../3-linux-headers-4.9.0-3-amd64_4.9.30-2+deb9u1_amd64.deb ...
Unpacking linux-headers-4.9.0-3-amd64 (4.9.30-2+deb9u1) over (4.9.30-2) ...
Preparing to unpack .../4-linux-headers-4.9.0-3-common_4.9.30-2+deb9u1_all.deb ...
Unpacking linux-headers-4.9.0-3-common (4.9.30-2+deb9u1) over (4.9.30-2) ...
Preparing to unpack .../5-linux-kbuild-4.9_4.9.30-2+deb9u1_amd64.deb ...
Unpacking linux-kbuild-4.9 (4.9.30-2+deb9u1) over (4.9.30-2) ...
Preparing to unpack .../6-linux-image-4.9.0-3-amd64_4.9.30-2+deb9u1_amd64.deb ...
Unpacking linux-image-4.9.0-3-amd64 (4.9.30-2+deb9u1) over (4.9.30-2) ...
Setting up linux-libc-dev:amd64 (4.9.30-2+deb9u1) ...
Setting up linux-headers-4.9.0-3-common (4.9.30-2+deb9u1) ...
Setting up libc6-i386 (2.24-11+deb9u1) ...
Setting up linux-compiler-gcc-6-x86 (4.9.30-2+deb9u1) ...
Setting up linux-kbuild-4.9 (4.9.30-2+deb9u1) ...
Setting up libc-l10n (2.24-11+deb9u1) ...
Processing triggers for man-db (2.7.6.1-2) ...
Setting up libc-dev-bin (2.24-11+deb9u1) ...
Setting up linux-image-4.9.0-3-amd64 (4.9.30-2+deb9u1) ...
/etc/kernel/postinst.d/initramfs-tools:
update-initramfs: Generating /boot/initrd.img-4.9.0-3-amd64
cryptsetup: WARNING: failed to detect canonical device of /dev/md0
cryptsetup: WARNING: could not determine root device from /etc/fstab
W: initramfs-tools configuration sets RESUME=UUID=054b217a-306b-4c18-b0bf-0ed85af6c6e1
W: but no matching swap device is available.
I: The initramfs will attempt to resume from /dev/md1p1
I: (UUID=bf72f3d4-3be4-4f68-8aae-4edfe5431670)
I: Set the RESUME variable to override this.
/etc/kernel/postinst.d/zz-update-grub:
Searching for GRUB installation directory ... found: /boot/grub
Searching for default file ... found: /boot/grub/default
Testing for an existing GRUB menu.lst file ... found: /boot/grub/menu.lst
Searching for splash image ... none found, skipping ...
Found kernel: /boot/vmlinuz-4.9.0-3-amd64
Found kernel: /boot/vmlinuz-3.16.0-4-amd64
Updating /boot/grub/menu.lst ... done

Setting up libc6-dev:amd64 (2.24-11+deb9u1) ...
Setting up locales (2.24-11+deb9u1) ...
Generating locales (this might take a while)...
  en_IN.UTF-8... done
Generation complete.
Setting up linux-headers-4.9.0-3-amd64 (4.9.30-2+deb9u1) ...
Processing triggers for libc-bin (2.24-11+deb9u1) ...

Reboot your server/desktop using reboot command:
$ sudo reboot

Oracle/RHEL/CentOS/Scientific Linux

Type the following yum command:
$ sudo yum update
$ sudo reboot

Fedora Linux

Type the following dnf command:
$ sudo dnf update
$ sudo reboot

Suse Enterprise Linux or Opensuse Linux

Type the following zypper command:
$ sudo zypper patch
$ sudo reboot

SUSE OpenStack Cloud 6

$ sudo zypper in -t patch SUSE-OpenStack-Cloud-6-2017-996=1
$ sudo reboot

SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP 12-SP1

$ sudo zypper in -t patch SUSE-SLE-SAP-12-SP1-2017-996=1
$ sudo reboot

SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12-SP1-LTSS

$ sudo zypper in -t patch SUSE-SLE-SERVER-12-SP1-2017-996=1
$ sudo reboot

SUSE Linux Enterprise Module for Public Cloud 12

$ sudo zypper in -t patch SUSE-SLE-Module-Public-Cloud-12-2017-996=1
$ sudo reboot

Verification

You need to make sure your version number changed after issuing reboot command
$ uname -a
$ uname -r
$ uname -mrs

Sample outputs:

Linux 4.4.0-81-generic x86_64
Main · Operating System · Redhat / CEntOS / Oracle Linux · Ubuntu

Cpustat – Monitors CPU Utilization by Running Processes in Linux

Main

Apache Kafka – The New Beginning for Messaging

Introduction

Apache Kafka is a popular distributed message broker designed to handle large volumes of real-time data efficiently. A Kafka cluster is not only highly scalable and fault-tolerant, but it also has a much higher throughput compared to other message brokers such as ActiveMQ and RabbitMQ. Though it is generally used as a pub/sub messaging system, a lot of organizations also use it for log aggregation because it offers persistent storage for published messages.

In this tutorial, you will learn how to install and use Apache Kafka 0.8.2.1 on Ubuntu 16.04.

Prerequisites

To follow along, you will need:

  • Ubuntu 16.04 Droplet
  • At least 4GB of swap space

Step 1 — Create a User for Kafka

As Kafka can handle requests over a network, you should create a dedicated user for it. This minimizes damage to your Ubuntu machine should the Kafka server be comprised.

Note: After setting up Apache Kafka, it is recommended that you create a different non-root user to perform other tasks on this server.

As root, create a user called kafka using the useradd command:

useradd kafka -m

Set its password using passwd:

passwd kafka

Add it to the sudo group so that it has the privileges required to install Kafka’s dependencies. This can be done using the adduser command:

adduser kafka sudo

Your Kafka user is now ready. Log into it using su:

su - kafka

Step 2 — Install Java

Before installing additional packages, update the list of available packages so you are installing the latest versions available in the repository:

sudo apt-get update

As Apache Kafka needs a Java runtime environment, use apt-get to install the default-jre package:

sudo apt-get install default-jre

Step 3 — Install ZooKeeper

Apache ZooKeeper is an open source service built to coordinate and synchronize configuration information of nodes that belong to a distributed system. A Kafka cluster depends on ZooKeeper to perform—among other things—operations such as detecting failed nodes and electing leaders.

Since the ZooKeeper package is available in Ubuntu’s default repositories, install it using apt-get.

sudo apt-get install zookeeperd

After the installation completes, ZooKeeper will be started as a daemon automatically. By default, it will listen on port 2181.

To make sure that it is working, connect to it via Telnet:

telnet localhost 2181

At the Telnet prompt, type in ruok and press ENTER.

If everything’s fine, ZooKeeper will say imok and end the Telnet session.

Step 4 — Download and Extract Kafka Binaries

Now that Java and ZooKeeper are installed, it is time to download and extract Kafka.

To start, create a directory called Downloads to store all your downloads.

mkdir -p ~/Downloads

Use wget to download the Kafka binaries.

wget "http://mirror.cc.columbia.edu/pub/software/apache/kafka/0.8.2.1/kafka_2.11-0.8.2.1.tgz" -O ~/Downloads/kafka.tgz

Create a directory called kafka and change to this directory. This will be the base directory of the Kafka installation.

mkdir -p ~/kafka && cd ~/kafka

Extract the archive you downloaded using the tar command.

tar -xvzf ~/Downloads/kafka.tgz --strip 1

Step 5 — Configure the Kafka Server

The next step is to configure the Kakfa server.

Open server.properties using vi:

vi ~/kafka/config/server.properties

By default, Kafka doesn’t allow you to delete topics. To be able to delete topics, add the following line at the end of the file:

~/kafka/config/server.properties

delete.topic.enable = true

Save the file, and exit vi.

Step 6 — Start the Kafka Server

Run the kafka-server-start.sh script using nohup to start the Kafka server (also called Kafka broker) as a background process that is independent of your shell session.

nohup ~/kafka/bin/kafka-server-start.sh ~/kafka/config/server.properties > ~/kafka/kafka.log 2>&1 &

Wait for a few seconds for it to start. You can be sure that the server has started successfully when you see the following messages in ~/kafka/kafka.log:

excerpt from ~/kafka/kafka.log

... [2015-07-29 06:02:41,736] INFO New leader is 0 (kafka.server.ZookeeperLeaderElector$LeaderChangeListener) [2015-07-29 06:02:41,776] INFO [Kafka Server 0], started (kafka.server.KafkaServer)

You now have a Kafka server which is listening on port 9092.

Step 7 — Test the Installation

Let us now publish and consume a “Hello World” message to make sure that the Kafka server is behaving correctly.

To publish messages, you should create a Kafka producer. You can easily create one from the command line using the kafka-console-producer.sh script. It expects the Kafka server’s hostname and port, along with a topic name as its arguments.

Publish the string “Hello, World” to a topic called TutorialTopic by typing in the following:

echo "Wassup Playas" | ~/kafka/bin/kafka-console-producer.sh --broker-list localhost:9092 --topic HariTopic > /dev/null

As the topic doesn’t exist, Kafka will create it automatically.

To consume messages, you can create a Kafka consumer using the kafka-console-consumer.sh script. It expects the ZooKeeper server’s hostname and port, along with a topic name as its arguments.

The following command consumes messages from the topic we published to. Note the use of the --from-beginning flag, which is present because we want to consume a message that was published before the consumer was started.

~/kafka/bin/kafka-console-consumer.sh --zookeeper localhost:2181 --topic HariTopic --from-beginning

If there are no configuration issues, you should see Hello,
World
in the output now.

The script will continue to run, waiting for more messages to be published to the topic. Feel free to open a new terminal and start a producer to publish a few more messages. You should be able to see them all in the consumer’s output instantly.

When you are done testing, press CTRL+C to stop the consumer script.

Step 8 — Install KafkaT (Optional)

KafkaT is a handy little tool from Airbnb which makes it easier for you to view details about your Kafka cluster and also perform a few administrative tasks from the command line. As it is a Ruby gem, you will need Ruby to use it. You will also need the build-essential package to be able to build the other gems it depends on. Install them using apt-get:

sudo apt-get install ruby ruby-dev build-essential

You can now install KafkaT using the gem command:

sudo gem install kafkat --source https://rubygems.org --no-ri --no-rdoc

Use vi to create a new file called .kafkatcfg.

vi ~/.kafkatcfg

This is a configuration file which KafkaT uses to determine the installation and log directories of your Kafka server. It should also point KafkaT to your ZooKeeper instance. Accordingly, add the following lines to it:

~/.kafkatcfg

{   "kafka_path": "~/kafka",   "log_path": "/tmp/kafka-logs",   "zk_path": "localhost:2181" }

You are now ready to use KafkaT. For a start, here’s how you would use it to view details about all Kafka partitions:

kafkat partitions

You should see the following output:

output of kafkat partitions

Topic           Partition   Leader      Replicas        ISRs     TutorialTopic   0             0           [0]           [0]

To learn more about KafkaT, refer to its GitHub repository.

Step 9 — Set Up a Multi-Node Cluster (Optional)

If you want to create a multi-broker cluster using more Ubuntu 16.04 machines, you should repeat Step 1, Step 3, Step 4 and Step 5 on each of the new machines. Additionally, you should make the following changes in the server.properties file in each of them:

  • the value of the broker.id property should be changed such that it is unique throughout the cluster
  • the value of the zookeeper.connect property should be changed such that all nodes point to the same ZooKeeper instance

If you want to have multiple ZooKeeper instances for your cluster, the value of the zookeeper.connect property on each node should be an identical, comma-separated string listing the IP addresses and port numbers of all the ZooKeeper instances.

Step 10 — Restrict the Kafka User

Now that all installations are done, you can remove the kafka user’s admin privileges. Before you do so, log out and log back in as any other non-root sudo user. If you are still running the same shell session you started this tutorial with, simply type exit.

To remove the kafka user’s admin privileges, remove it from the sudo group.

sudo deluser kafka sudo

To further improve your Kafka server’s security, lock the kafka user’s password using the passwd command. This makes sure that nobody can directly log into it.

sudo passwd kafka -l

At this point, only root or a sudo user can log in as kafka by typing in the following command:

sudo su - kafka

In the future, if you want to unlock it, use passwd with the -u option:

sudo passwd kafka -u

Conclusion

You now have a secure Apache Kafka running on your Ubuntu server. You can easily make use of it in your projects by creating Kafka producers and consumers using Kafka clients which are available for most programming languages. To learn more about Kafka, do go through its documentation.

Finally for GUI Download

http://www.kafkatool.com/download/kafkatool.sh

Youtube Video Link [Watch Here]

 

Operating System · Redhat / CEntOS / Oracle Linux · Ubuntu

Linux security alert: Bug in sudo’s get_process_ttyname() [ CVE-2017-1000367 ]

There is a serious vulnerability in sudo command that grants root access to anyone with a shell account. It works on SELinux enabled systems such as CentOS/RHEL and others too. A local user with privileges to execute commands via sudo could use this flaw to escalate their privileges to root. Patch your system as soon as possible.

It was discovered that Sudo did not properly parse the contents of /proc/[pid]/stat when attempting to determine its controlling tty. A local attacker in some configurations could possibly use this to overwrite any file on the filesystem, bypassing intended permissions or gain root shell.
From the description

We discovered a vulnerability in Sudo’s get_process_ttyname() for Linux:
this function opens “/proc/[pid]/stat” (man proc) and reads the device number of the tty from field 7 (tty_nr). Unfortunately, these fields are space-separated and field 2 (comm, the filename of the command) can
contain spaces (CVE-2017-1000367).

For example, if we execute Sudo through the symlink “./ 1 “, get_process_ttyname() calls sudo_ttyname_dev() to search for the non-existent tty device number “1” in the built-in search_devs[].

Next, sudo_ttyname_dev() calls the function sudo_ttyname_scan() to search for this non-existent tty device number “1” in a breadth-first traversal of “/dev”.

Last, we exploit this function during its traversal of the world-writable “/dev/shm”: through this vulnerability, a local user can pretend that his tty is any character device on the filesystem, and
after two race conditions, he can pretend that his tty is any file on the filesystem.

On an SELinux-enabled system, if a user is Sudoer for a command that does not grant him full root privileges, he can overwrite any file on the filesystem (including root-owned files) with his command’s output,
because relabel_tty() (in src/selinux.c) calls open(O_RDWR|O_NONBLOCK) on his tty and dup2()s it to the command’s stdin, stdout, and stderr. This allows any Sudoer user to obtain full root privileges.

A list of affected Linux distro

  1. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 (sudo)
  2. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 (sudo)
  3. Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server (v. 5 ELS) (sudo)
  4. Oracle Enterprise Linux 6
  5. Oracle Enterprise Linux 7
  6. Oracle Enterprise Linux Server 5
  7. CentOS Linux 6 (sudo)
  8. CentOS Linux 7 (sudo)
  9. Debian wheezy
  10. Debian jessie
  11. Debian stretch
  12. Debian sid
  13. Ubuntu 17.04
  14. Ubuntu 16.10
  15. Ubuntu 16.04 LTS
  16. Ubuntu 14.04 LTS
  17. SUSE Linux Enterprise Software Development Kit 12-SP2
  18. SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for Raspberry Pi 12-SP2
  19. SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12-SP2
  20. SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 12-SP2
  21. OpenSuse, Slackware, and Gentoo Linux

How do I patch sudo on Debian/Ubuntu Linux server?

To patch Ubuntu/Debian Linux apt-get command or apt command:
$ sudo apt update
$ sudo apt upgrade

How do I patch sudo on CentOS/RHEL/Scientific/Oracle Linux server?

Run yum command:
$ sudo yum update

How do I patch sudo on Fedora Linux server?

Run dnf command:
$ sudo dnf update

How do I patch sudo on Suse/OpenSUSE Linux server?

Run zypper command:
$ sudo zypper update

How do I patch sudo on Arch Linux server?

Run pacman command:
$ sudo pacman -Syu

How do I patch sudo on Alpine Linux server?

Run apk command:
# apk update && apk upgrade

How do I patch sudo on Slackware Linux server?

Run upgradepkg command:
# upgradepkg sudo-1.8.20p1-i586-1_slack14.2.txz

How do I patch sudo on Gentoo Linux server?

Run emerge command:
# emerge --sync
# emerge --ask --oneshot --verbose ">=app-admin/sudo-1.8.20_p1"